Welcome to the British Shakespeare Association

The British Shakespeare Association is a professional association of teachers, researchers, theatre practitioners, writers and enthusiasts. The BSA is a registered charity and its aims are educational – ‘to promote and foster a better understanding of Shakespeare and his work’. Read more about us »

Postdoctoral research fellowships in the Centre for the History of Emotions

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The Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions in collaboration with the University of Western Australia, the University of Adelaide, the University of Melbourne, The University of Sydney and the University of Queensland, seeks to appoint...
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Teaching Shakespeare Issue Four

Please enjoy the attached free copy of  the 4th issue of’Teaching Shakespeare’,  published twice a year by the British Shakespeare Association and edited by Dr Sarah Olive. Just click and download the pdf below to read it Taking ‘Heritage’ as its theme,...
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Shakespeare and Education at BritGrad 2013 – Kathryn Twigg

The British Graduate Shakespeare Conference (also known as BritGrad) drew like-minded students, academics and practitioners from all over the world to the small town of Stratford-upon-Avon and the even smaller Shakespeare Institute. The entirely student run conference took place...
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Taking Education Online

In the past year or so the world of education has been buzzing with news of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses). There have been a number of factors: the growing open information movement, the wider availability of online resources worldwide, and the increasing costs of...
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Shakespeare Under The Coalition: An End to Shakespeare For All?

A paper given by Dr. Sarah Olive, The University of York at the ‘We need to talk about teaching conference’ in February 2013, at King’s College London. Abstract: This paper considers the place of Shakespeare in the policy, speeches and press releases of the...
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Taking Shakespeare to the French.

When I was asked if I wanted to give 24 French children their first experience of learning Shakespeare at Kings Norton Girls School, my first response was a very excited yes! But when the reality sunk in this responsibility is huge, I felt like it had to be perfect or they were...
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‘How did it help me to understand the play? Experiencing it for myself’ – Teaching Shakespeare at an all-boys comprehensive, post 3

Hello again, and happy 2013!   Here is the (very belated) follow-up post to the work on Macbeth my class did at the end of last year. They answered the questions about the method of teaching, and how they felt the process enabled them to understand the text. Here are the...
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‘It’s making me a bit more like Shakespeare’ – Teaching Shakespeare at an all-boys comprehensive, post 2

For the past week, the boys have been working on presentations which give an overview of their knowledge of the play and an analysis of their choices in adaptation in their performance and video. The assessment is for Speaking and Listening, for which the four criteria are:...
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Education in the digital age: new resources and learning

A week or so ago Jason Lodge posted an article on The Conversation blog entitled Education in the information age: is technology making us stupid? Lodge’s post is well worth reading so do follow the link, but one of his conclusions is that the age-old model of teaching...
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‘A babe is moulded’: the influence of family on how children value Shakespeare

From Sarah Olive, Lecturer in English in Education, University of York: In my last article for Alluvium, I presented a rationale for using Lady Gaga to teach Shakespeare, along with a Powerpoint teaching resource. Sheffield Children’s Festival offered a unique chance to...
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