Welcome to the British Shakespeare Association

The British Shakespeare Association is a professional association of teachers, researchers, theatre practitioners, writers and enthusiasts. The BSA is a registered charity and its aims are educational – ‘to promote and foster a better understanding of Shakespeare and his work’. Read more about us »

‘All our knowledge has its origin in our perceptions’ – Teaching Shakespeare at an all-boys comprehensive, post 1

So, here begins the diary of my experiences teaching Shakespeare in an all-boys secondary school. After studying an MA in Renaissance Literature, completing a dissertation on Shakespeare in education, and researching how Shakespeare is taught around the world for the Royal...
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Brian Lighthill explores ways of breaking down student resistance to compulsory Shakespeare in the curriculum…

To be honest, breaking down student apathy towards all things Shakespeare doesn’t always come easily. There are always going to be students who just balk at the mere mention of Shakespeare. They might not know much about him – but they are ‘dead sure he is going to be...
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Shakespeare in the special education classroom – a rationale from Heather Ruth Edgren, in Eagle River, Alaska

Heather Ruth Edgren graduated from Memphis State University (now named University of Memphis) in 1989 with a degree in Special Education. She  taught for two years in Memphis, Tennessee, in a self-contained Special Education classroom at the elementary level (students 10-12 years...
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What actually happened in that ‘Active Reading’ workshop at the Unlearning Shakespeare Symposium at Oxford Brookes ? James Stredder

I began with the claim that ‘active reading’ – reading at least part of the text aloud together in class – is of value for advanced readers studying Shakespeare, as well as for beginners. The argument is that physical experience of the text, through collective reading...
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Russell Harris says ‘Teaching Shakespeare leaves you breathless.’

Russell Harris writes:  I am an English teacher at a central London academy, who also enjoys writing. I’ve had one or two small contributions published in the TES (and some longer articles in other publications) and would like to try to develop this interest. Teaching...
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‘Active Reading’: a workshop for the Oxford Brookes Symposium. James Stredder

On 28th June, Oxford Brookes University will be hosting a one-day Symposium, exploring ‘how creative teaching and learning fits with, or doesn’t fit with, formal learning structures at school and university’. BSA trustee Paul Prescott, of the RSC/University of Warwick ‘Teaching...
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Teaching Shakespeare partnership

Teaching Shakespeare is a ground-breaking education partnership between the Royal Shakespeare Company and the University of Warwick which provides online professional development for teachers and aims to transform the classroom experience of Shakespeare – wherever you are in the...
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From James Stredder. Happy Birthday, William! A teachers’s toast.

How did ‘Shakespeare’ first enter your consciousness – mysteriously coded, like algebra, or docking at your school desk, like a huge cargo vessel, or, perhaps, magically, in a film or in the words of a gifted English teacher, introducing you to your first tale, from a store that...
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Shakespeare: Bridging the language gap for students learning English as a second language

Continuing from the themes and issues raised by the presentations of Sarah Olive, Peter Kirwin, and I at this years BSA conference, I would like to pick up on Olive’s motive to ‘decrease perceptions of Shakespeare’s remoteness’.  Listening to all of the research presented, this...
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